Soccer / Football: Mafia, business or sport? — ReLive English

Updated press release on European football / European soccer.

via Soccer / Football: Mafia, business or sport? — ReLive English

Posted in B1 - Intermediate English, B2 - Upper Intermediate (Advanced English), C1 - Proficiency, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Soccer / Football: Mafia, business or sport?

Football: Mafia, business or sport?

Posted in B1 - Intermediate English, B2 - Upper Intermediate (Advanced English), C1 - Proficiency, Sports | Leave a comment

Executive Peer Pressure

Competition among peers has grown in recent years to uncouth levels. What are we doing to prevent and enhance employee relationships?

ReLive English

executive-peer-pressure
Every individual has experienced peer pressure at some point in their lives, often beginning in early childhood. While we like to think we have outgrown the playground, adults still regularly succumb to peer pressure. It is the responsibility of strong leaders to ensure that the peer pressure within their organisation is carefully managed to maintain a positive and productive work environment.

The primary concern when it comes to peer pressure is the tendency for even the most ethical individuals to avoid saying ‘no’, participating in behaviours they would not have otherwise to avoid damaging their social station.

However, this same desire to avoid discomfort can encourage employees to maintain and model appropriate behaviours. If managers can build a strong sense of teamwork within their group with a focus on productivity, a positive organisational culture will quickly take over the office.

Peer pressure can become a managerial asset when teams are…

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Executive Peer Pressure

executive-peer-pressure

Every individual has experienced peer pressure at some point in their lives, often beginning in early childhood. While we like to think we have outgrown the playground, adults still regularly succumb to peer pressure. It is the responsibility of strong leaders to ensure that the peer pressure within their organisation is carefully managed to maintain a positive and productive work environment.

The primary concern when it comes to peer pressure is the tendency for even the most ethical individuals to avoid saying ‘no’, participating in behaviours they would not have otherwise to avoid damaging their social station.

However, this same desire to avoid discomfort can encourage employees to maintain and model appropriate behaviours. If managers can build a strong sense of teamwork within their group with a focus on productivity, a positive organisational culture will quickly take over the office.

Peer pressure can become a managerial asset when teams are assembled. Allowing team members to determine their own hierarchies will often prevent negative feelings, but peer pressure may quickly set in. It is important that managers step in if it appears that peer pressure from one or more individuals appears to be making others uncomfortable or to prevent peer pressure from sending a project down a path likely to lead to a negative outcome.

When managers set clear common goals for team members, peer pressure can naturally help to keep the project on track.

When peer pressure takes on a negative form, there will always be a risk that bullying behaviours will begin. Managers should quickly intervene if it appears that an individual has become ostracised by the majority of the group to determine whether peer pressure is involved, particularly if the behaviours started after the outcast individual disagreed with a popular opinion.

Effective leaders must ride a fine line between the desire to foster a culture of support and engagement within the organisation and while avoiding coming across as encouraging staff to conform to peer pressure.

While on of the hallmarks of a successful team is the ability to reach a compromise and to work together for the greater good of the organisation, employees must feel free to disagree with the actions of the group and to pose their own opinions without negative consequences.

An effective leader must be able to recognise when an individual is at risk for yielding to the forces of peer pressure and to successfully intervene, which often involves both addressing those engaging in pressuring tactics and providing coping mechanisms for the at risk employee.

These interventions are particularly important in the event of peer pressure leading employees to engage in acts that negatively impact the organisation.

These easily influenced employees should be taught that they can say ‘no’ to their peers and consult their managers on the situation without fear of repercussions, and all employees reminded of the goals and values of the organisation.

The power of peer can be seen at its best use when the organisational culture has successfully taken root in the hearts of employees, encouraging staff members to support each other, work productively, and to strive toward common goals.

When all parties embrace a positive culture and feel supported in their right to say ‘no’ and to voice their opinions, managers will be able to utilise positive peer pressure to promote team work, productivity, and employee engagement.

Glossary:

 1. peer pressure: the pressure that one experiences from colleagues / companions at work
2. to outgrow: to mature, to become accustomed to and advance forward
 3. to succumb: to give way to superior force; yield
 4. otherwise: in another manner or way
 5. discomfort: lack of comfort, unpleasant feeling
 6. asset: a useful and desirable thing or quality
 7. bullying: the act of insulting or putting down a colleague / classmate
 8. engagement: participation, involvement
Posted in A1 - Beginners English, A2 - Waystage English (Pre-Intermediate), B1 - Intermediate English, B2 - Upper Intermediate (Advanced English), C1 - Proficiency | Tagged | 1 Comment

The Robinson List

Robinson List

Are you looking for a way to get rid of those pesky telemarketers who call you at home time and time again?

The answer here in Europe is called the Robinson List (La Lista Robinson). By far the most effective legal way to protect your privacy while saving a few extra minutes of your life. Time is money.

How much time have telemarketers and the like stolen minutes or even hours of your life, trying to convince you to buy, purchase or subscribe to their services? When I think about the amount of time spent on the telephone trying to explain to the poor, defenseless and desparate salesperson on the other end that I don’t have time (nor the money) to cater to their sales pitch, my blood begins to curdle.

I still remember having to explain to a telecommunications company the fact that my mother had passed away and that I didn’t have time to talk to them about their new service. The unfortunate caller that day was left speechless and even apologised for his untimely call.

But that is just what you can expect from joining the Robinson List. Just today I received a phone call from a law firm offering their services here in Spain and I mentioned that I belonged to the Robinson List – the response? – “I am sorry for having phoned you without your express permission. Please accept our sincerest apologies . This will never happen again.”

I was taken aback at such professionalism on the part of the telemarketer. But then again, I realised just how much time they had stolen from me throughout the years and I began to thank God for the existence of the Robinson List.

If  you suffer from a similar predicament and are looking to rid yourself of untimely and inopportune telemarketers, be sure to check out the Robinson List (la Lista Robinson).

Be sure to visit: https://www.listarobinson.es/default.asp

USEFUL TERMS:

to get rid of: to free yourself from something, to liberate yourself

pesky: annoying, bothersome

telemarketer: a person or salesperson that tries to sell you something via telephone

by far: without a doubt, to a strong degree

to purchase: to buy

to cater to: to pay attention to, to serve

to pass away: diplomatic language for ” to die ”

speechless: without words to say

express: adj. expressed in writing or by word of mouth

to be taken aback: to be surprised

Posted in A1 - Beginners English, A2 - Waystage English (Pre-Intermediate), B1 - Intermediate English, B2 - Upper Intermediate (Advanced English), C1 - Proficiency | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Cyprus: 300 Euros Per Citizen

europe

The days of rationing have returned and there is no end in sight for the average or median citizen in Cyprus. Three hundred euros is the limit on how much they can withdraw from their own bank account.

How would you feel if your government were to limit the amount of money you can take out of your own account? How would you feel if they were to expropriate your earnings for the common good? How deep does the crisis run through the actual system itself? These are some of the questions on the mind of the common European citizen.

A simple analysis sheds some light on the current “crisis” – which is actually not a crisis at all, but a simple mistake in Accounting 101 – “Do not spend more than you have.” European governments are experts at budgeting huge amounts of money towards camouflaged social activities that really have an effective lucrative purpose in mind.

Behind the ranks of government officials, especially in countries like Germany, Spain, Portugal and Italy are an increasing minority – those who steal money “on the fly” and those who truly care about the welfare state.

The fact of the matter is that there is no longer an ideological battle between socialism or capitalism – this is long gone. What the current dilemma really involves is a battle for popularity.

Popularity is a two-edged sword. You can use popularity to your advantage to convince or to persuade, yet each and every word that comes out of your mouth is fiercely weighed and measured in terms of political correctness, manners, congeniality, etc. This is what European politicians have forgot. They simply have no interest in connecting with the average citizen. They have simply wasted their foregone popularity, only to drown in an abyss of self-pity and inevitable remorse.

On the upside, there is an increasing majority of citizens who are willing to take public office and to change things for the better. Every news item in a European newspaper must be taken with a grain of salt: There are still the old-fashioned critics of capitalism long gone, and the advent of newcomers looking to make their room in the battle for popularity.

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